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TITLE:
Comic Strip Conversations

CONTENT:
A Comic Strip Conversation is a conversation between two or more people using simple illustrations in a comic strip format. They show children how to behave in a socially acceptable manner and conform to social standards. The effectiveness can be enhanced by incorporating a child’s favorite cartoon character (e.g. Dora, Elmo) into the illustration.

GRADE LEVEL:
K-6

CURRICULUM STANDARDS:

SS.K.E.1.4: Identify the difference between basic needs and wants.
HE.K.B.2.1: Recognize healthy ways to express needs, wants, and feelings.
HE.K.C.1.1: Recognize healthy behaviors.
HE.1.B.2.1: Identify healthy ways to express needs, wants, and feelings.
HE.1.C.1.1: Identify healthy behaviors.
HE.2.B.2.1: Demonstrate healthy ways to express needs, wants, and feelings.


DESCRIPTION OF PRACTICES:

  1. Involve the child in creating his or her own comic strip conversation.
  2. Decide what skill or behavior the child is lacking and needs to work on.
  3. Make a book of comic strip frames, and after leading the child through several examples, have them create the conversations and solutions on their own for the targeted skill.
  4. You can also allow the child to create his own drawings or use his favorite cartoon character in the comic strip.

IMPLEMENTATION CONSIDERATIONS IN VARIOUS SERVICE DELIVERY MODELS:
ASD, individual instruction, self-contained.

REFERENCE CITATIONS:

Gray, C. (1994) Comic Strip Conversations. Arlington, TX: Future Horizons.

Glaeser, B.C., Pierson, M.R., & Fritschmann, N. (2003). Comic Strip Conversations: A Positive Behavioral Support Strategy.
Teaching Exceptional Children, 36(2), 14-19.

Rogers, M.F. & Myles, B.S. (2001). Using Social Stories and Comic Strip Conversations to Interpret Social Situations for an Adolescent with Asperger Syndrome.
Intervention inSchool and Clinic, 36(5), 310-313.

Pierson, M.R. & Glaecer, B.C. (2007). Using Comic Strip Conversations to Increase Social Satisfaction and Decrease Loneliness in Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder. Education and Training in Developmental Disabilities,42(4), 460-466.